4 Hip Stretched to fix your Lower Back Pain

More often than not, the site of the pain isn't the route of the problem. Often times low back pain comes from the hips, a product of our poor posture and daily habits.

Back pain sucks. Trust me... it runs in my family and I can tell when I have had a lazy day (i.e. spent too much time in a poor position). The good news is that for most of us, the pain comes from a neuromuscular problem, NOT from some sort of disease or irreversible problem. You not only have the power to take you pain and your health into your own hands, you have the RESPONSIBILITY to do so.

There are literally thousands of stretches and mobilizations to improve your hip mobility (leading to a better back), and I am not exaggerating. Below are 4 of my favorites that I use often. I would be lying if I said every day, but you are more than welcome to do so. The more the more frequent the better. 

 

HIP FLEXOR STRETCH

Start in a half-kneeling position. Use your glutes to tilt your pelvis backward. You should feel a stretch in the front of your hip (think 'front pocket').

Hold for 1.5 mins/side

 

Good

Good

Back Fault

Back Fault

Lean Fault

Lean Fault

 

QUADRICEPS TACK-AND-FLOSS

Lay facedown with one leg on a foam roller. Use the roller to find tight spots/knots in your quads. Once you find a spot, add tension and flex your knee with the roller in contact with the spot. "Floss" the muscle by flexing and extending your knee until the tension lessens or goes away. Repeat in a new spot. 

Continue for 2 mins/side

 

GLUTE SELF-MYOFASCIAL RELEASE (SMFR)

Cross the bottom foot over the support leg, near the knee, while sitting with one side on the roller. The roller should be positioned underneath your hip bone (ASIS). Roll from side to side to relieve tension. 

Continue for 2 mins/side.

 

HIP OPENER

Align your front foot with you back knee. Use your hand or your elbow to press your front knee out to the side. You should feel the tension in the outside of your hip. Oscillate/scrub in and out of tension. You can change the stretch by pressing your knee out further or turning the sole of your foot to face the side. 

Continue for 2 mins/side.

 

Often is better. If it pinches, avoid it, and if you stop breathing than the intensity of the stretch or mobilization is too high.

Happy hunting!

 

-Mark Murdoch. Chiropractic Student (University of Western States). Kinesiologist.

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Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologis, Chiropractic Student Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca