How to monitor Training Intensity

How to monitor Training Intensity

It is common for people to go to the gym without a plan, spend 15 minutes on a foam roller, walk another 5 on the treadmill and then spend the next 30 minutes lifting weights that are way too light for them. They then 'call it a day', pack up their belongings, chug their sports recovery drink and head home. These people have wasted their time.

In order to make progress, you need to follow the Overload Principle. The Overload Principle is the concept that in order to make progress and gain strength you need to challenge the limits of the body and overload your capacity. The concept holds generally true. Translated to strength training, in order to get stronger, you need to lift heavy weights. While you don't always need to go to failure, you do need to work hard enough for the body (and the brain) to decide that it is worth it to put on more muscle. This comes down to a question of Intensity.

Intensity is pretty much what is sounds like: how intense is the effort.

I like to use a scale called the Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE). RPE is a subjective measure of intensity, usually on a scale of 6-20 or 1-10 depending on the training day...I like to use a scale called the Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE). RPE is a subjective measure of intensity, usually on a scale of 6-20 or 1-10 depending on the training day.

Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologist, Chiropractic Student. Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca

Bulletproof Ankles

Bulletproof Ankles

Your ankles are our connection with our foundation, which is our feet.

The feet are our connection to the ground and responsible for every athletic movement we perform. All of the transfer of forces happens through the feet. Bullet Proof Ankles are essential to be able to run, jump, cut, kick, punch, squat, lunge.... you name it. The mobility-stability balance is the name of the game, and with a little bit of work and a lot of consistency you can increase your deadlift weight, decrease your 100m time and maximize your vertical all by taking care of your ankles.
 

Here are the key notes:

  • maintain your arch
  • walk and stand with your feet straight
  • choose minimal footwear when you can. When you can't, take off the restrictive footwear periodically and stretch/mobilize
  • Mobilize and work on your ankles/shins daily

If you follow those steps I guarantee that you will increase your ankle mobility, decrease foot pain, and your improve your injury resilience. You will feel better, move better, and perform better.

Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologist, Chiropractic Student. Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca

Why you keep failing the POPAT, even though you are fit enough.

Why you keep failing the POPAT, even though you are fit enough.

Periodically I get a client who has trained their butt off and is ready to smash the POPAT. Their numbers are good. They're strong enough and fit enough. Then they go to take the POPAT.... and they fall short. Time, after time.

So what's the deal?

GENERALLY, I FIND 3 MAIN REASONS WHY SOMEONE WILL FAIL THE POPAT, EVEN IF THEY ARE FIT ENOUGH.

These reasons are: 1. Pacing, 2. Timidness, 3. No warm-up...

Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologist, Chiropractic Student. Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca

How to be Bulletproof

Whether you are a recreational athlete, professional athlete, high-performance worker (e.g. police officer or firefighter) you rely on a body that is injury free and performance ready. Regardless of the demands, you need to meet it is vital that you are strong enough, fast enough, and resilient enough to perform your tasks without getting injured. You can bulletproof your body by lifting heavy, taking advantage of variation and challenging your position.

CONTINUE READING...

Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologist, Chiropractic Student. Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca

Injury Prevention is my Jam (and how I predicted a full ACL tear)

In late 2015 I was watching the Free Shoot section during a University of the Fraser Valley’s Men’s Basketball Team practice. After a few minutes of observation, I texted the head athletic therapist of UFV and said “This guy is going to have knee problems” accompanied by a picture. Early 2016 he tore his ACL on a non-contact injury while changing directions at the baseline. I wasn’t thrilled that I was right, yet I did take some pride in my prediction coming true.

Continue Reading...

Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologist, Chiropractic Student. Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca

My Favorite Mobility Tools

My Favorite Mobility Tools

Mobility is important. Like, super important. It might even be more important than strength training... I tend to like my toys, which means I spend a lot of time testing out mobility tools. Below I is a list of my favorite/most used tools.

Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologist, Chiropractic Student. Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca

POPAT/PARE: Advice from the Experts

POPAT/PARE: Advice from the Experts

If you are training from the POPAT, PARE, COPAT, or any other Physical Abilities Test, you will definitively benefit from this advice. I asked experts in the industry including trainers, testers, professors and current Law Enforcement Officers for their advice.

I asked two simple questions, one about PAT training and obstacles, and the other about life in the force. Each of these pieces of advice is super valuable, so I encourage you to take action and your next step towards your Law Enforcement career.

Author: Mark Murdoch, Kinesiologist, Chiropractic Student. Have questions? Email me. I want to help! mark@leofitness.ca